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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 350-353

Pregabalin in monitored anesthesia care for ear-nose-throat surgery


1 Department of Anesthesia, Hamdard Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Jamia Hamdard University, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Pediatric Trauma and Anaesthesiology, Super Speciality Paediatric Hospital and Postgraduate Teaching Institute, Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India
3 Department of ENT, Hamdard Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Jamia Hamdard University, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Anjali Kochhar
Department of Anesthesia, Hamdard Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Jamia Hamdard University, New Delhi
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0259-1162.194589

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Aim: The aim of this study was to determine intraoperative sedative and perioperative analgesic requirement and associated side effects of pregabalin (150 mg) for monitored anesthesia care during ear-nose-throat (ENT) surgeries. Materials and Methods: The study design was randomized and single-blinded; fifty patients undergoing elective ambulatory ENT surgeries under monitored anesthesia care were randomly allocated to receive either placebo (Group P) or pregabalin (Group PG) 150 mg, orally 1 h before surgery. All patients were then given intravenous (i.v.) midazolam 2 mg and fentanyl 1 μg/kg and local anesthesia at the site. Sedation was induced by administering an i.v. bolus of propofol 0.8 mg/kg and was maintained by continuous infusion of propofol. Level of sedation was assessed by Ramsay scale, and propofol infusion was titrated accordingly. Intraoperative pain was assessed by verbal rating scale (VRS) score. Patient having VRS >4 or complaint of pain was given fentanyl (0.5 μg/kg) i.v. bolus. Intraoperative sedative and analgesic requirement were recorded. Postoperative visual analog scale scores and requirement of analgesics were recorded for the first 24 h after surgery. Diclofenac 75 mg intramuscular (i.m.) was administered as rescue analgesic. Side effects (nausea/vomiting, sedation, dizziness, blurred vision) were also recorded. Results: Intraoperative propofol (212 ± 11 mg vs. 174 ± 9 mg; P = 0.013) and fentanyl (120 ± 8 μg vs. 94 ± 6 μg; P = 0.02) consumption was significantly lower in Group PG. Time to first analgesic request was longer (6.1 ± 0.4 h vs. 9.5 ± 1.2 h) with lesser requirement of analgesics (diclofenac) in the postoperative period. Incidence of side effects (sedation, nausea, vomiting) was found to be similar in both the groups. Conclusion: Premedication with pregabalin (150 mg) reduces intraoperative sedative and perioperative analgesic requirement in patients undergoing ENT surgeries under monitored anesthesia care with tolerable side effects.


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